Awards Season 09-10


SUNDANCE 2010: THE WINNERS

The 2010 Sundance Film Festival Juries consisted of:

U.S. Documentary Competition: Greg Barker, Dayna Goldfine, Nancy Miller, Morgan Spurlock, Ondi Timoner; U.S. Dramatic Competition: Russell Banks, Jason Kliot, Karyn Kusama, Parker Posey,

Robert Yeoman; World Cinema Documentary Competition: Jennifer Baichwal, Jeffrey Brown,

Asako Fujioka; World Cinema Dramatic Competition: Alison Maclean, Lisa Schwarzbaum, Sigurjon “Joni” Sighvatsson; Shorts Competition: Sterlin Harjo, Brent Hoff, Christine Vachon; Alfred P. Sloan Award: Peter Galison, Darcy Kelley, Joe Palca, Paul Sereno, Marianna Palka.

For the 2010 Sundance Film Festival, 117 feature-length films were selected including 85 world premieres, 11 North American premieres, and 12 U.S. premieres representing 39 countries with 51 first-time filmmakers, including 27 in competition. These films were selected from 3,724 feature-length film submissions composed of 1,920 U.S. and 1,804 international feature-length films.

2010 Sundance Film Festival Award Winners:

The Grand Jury Prize: Documentary was presented to Restrepo, directed by Sebastian Junger and Tim Hetherington. Sebastian Junger and Tim Hetherington’s year dug in with the Second Platoon in one of Afghanistan’s most strategically crucial valleys reveals extraordinary insight into the surreal combination of back breaking labor, deadly firefights, and camaraderie as the soldiers painfully push back the Taliban.

The Grand Jury Prize: Dramatic was presented to Winter’s Bone, directed by Debra Granik; written by Debra Granik and Anne Rosellini. An unflinching Ozark Mountain girl hacks through dangerous social terrain as she hunts down her missing father while trying to keep her family intact.

The World Cinema Jury Prize: Documentary was presented to The Red Chapel (Det Røde Kapel)directed by Mads Brügger. A journalist with no scruples, a self-proclaimed spastic, and a comedian travel to North Korea under the guise of a cultural exchange visit to challenge one of the world’s most notorious regimes. Denmark

The World Cinema Jury Prize: Dramatic was presented to Animal Kingdom, written and directed by David Michôd. After the death of his mother, a seventeen year-old boy is thrust precariously between an explosive criminal family and a detective who thinks he can save him. Australia

The Audience Awards are presented to both a dramatic and documentary film in four Competitions as voted by Sundance Film Festival audiences. The 2010 Sundance Film Festival Audience

Awards are presented by Honda.

The Audience Award: Documentary was presented to WAITING FOR SUPERMAN, directed by Davis Guggenheim, for his examination of the crisis of public education in the United States through multiple interlocking stories.

The Audience Award: Dramatic was presented to happythankyoumoreplease, written and directed by Josh Radnor, about six New Yorkers juggling love, friendship, and the keenly challenging specter of adulthood.

The World Cinema Audience Award: Documentary was presented to Wasteland, directed by Lucy Walker about international art star Vik Muniz, garbage pickers in the world’s largest landfill in Rio de Janeiro and the transformative power of art. United Kingdom / Brazil

The World Cinema Audience Award: Dramatic was presented to Contracorriente (Undertow) written and directed by Javier Fuentes-Leõn, an unusual ghost story set on the Peruvian seaside in which a married fisherman struggles to reconcile his devotion to his male lover within his town’s rigid traditions. Peru / Colombia / France / Germany

New for 2010: Best of NEXT. Selected by ballots cast by the eight NEXT filmmakers, this award celebrates a film creating the greatest art on a low budget. The Best of NEXT award is presented by YouTube™.

The Best of NEXT award was presented to Homewrecker, directed by Todd Barnes and Brad Barnes and written by Todd Barnes, Brad Barnes, and Sophie Goodhart. The last romantic in New York City is an ex-con locksmith on work release.

Directing Awards recognize excellence in directing for dramatic and documentary features.

The Directing Award: Documentary was presented to Smash His Camera, directed by Leon Gast, about famous celebrity photographer and original paparazzo, Ron Galella.

The Directing Award: Dramatic was presented to 3 Backyards, directed and written by Eric Mendelsohn. The film is about a trio of brief, life-altering adventures unfolding in a seemingly normal autumn day.

The World Cinema Directing Award: Documentary was presented to Space Tourists, directed by Christian Frei who explores the impact of space tourism in the heavens and on earth. Switzerland

The World Cinema Directing Award: Dramatic was presented to Southern District, directed and written by Juan Carlos Valdivia, about a bourgeois family in La Paz, Bolivia who watches as social change begins to penetrate their insulated world. Bolivia

The Waldo Salt Screenwriting Award was presented to Winter’s Bone, directed by Debra Granik; written by Debra Granik and Anne Rosellini. An unflinching Ozark Mountain girl hacks through dangerous social terrain as she hunts down her missing father while trying to keep her family intact.

The World Cinema Screenwriting Award was presented to Southern District, written and directed by Juan Carlos Valdivia, about a bourgeois family in La Paz, Bolivia who watches as social change begins to penetrate their insulated world. Bolivia

The Documentary Editing Award was presented to Joan Rivers-A Piece Of Work, edited by Penelope Falk; directed by Ricki Stern and Annie Sundberg. An exposé chronicling the private dramas of irreverent, legendary comedian and pop icon Joan Rivers.

The World Cinema Documentary Editing Award was presented to A Film Unfinished, written and directed by Yael Hersonski. Edited by Joëlle Alexis. The film is a powerful documentary about Nazi-produced propaganda films. Germany / Israel.

The Excellence in Cinematography Awards honor exceptional cinematography in both dramatic and documentary categories:

The Excellence in Cinematography Award: Documentary was presented to The Oath, directed by Laura Poitras. Cinematographers: Kirsten Johnson and Laura Poitras. The interlocking drama of two brothers-in-law whose associations with al Qaeda in the 1990s propelled them on divergent courses.

The Excellence in Cinematography Award: Dramatic was presented to Obselidia,written and directed by Diane Bell. Cinematographer: Zak Mulligan. In his quest to document nearly extinct occupations, a man unexpectedly finds romance.

The World Cinema Cinematography Award: Documentary was presented to His & Hers, directed by Ken Wardrop. Cinematographers: Kate McCullough and Michael Lavelle. A 90-year-old love story through the collective voice of 70 days at different stages of their lives. Ireland

The World Cinema Cinematography Award: Dramatic was presented to The Man Next Door (El Hombre de al Lado). Directors and cinematographers Mariano Cohn and Gastón Duprat. A small incident over two neighbors’ common wall sparks a conflict which affects the intimacy of the view over the chimney; the protagonist sparks a conflict and with paranoiac obsession destroys everyday life. Argentina

World Cinema Special Jury Prize: Dramatic for Breakout Performance was presented to Tatiana Maslany for her role as a starry-eyed teenager in Grown Up Movie StarCanada

World Cinema Special Jury Prize: Documentary was presented to Enemies of the People, directed by Rob Lemkin and Thet Sambath, for their watershed account of Cambodian history and a quest for closure on one of the world’s darkest episodes. Cambodia / United Kingdom

Special Jury Prize: Documentary was presented to GASLAND, directed by Josh Fox. With spirit, strength, and a sense of humor, Fox’s personal documentary takes a look at how natural gas affects our air and drinking water.

Special Jury Prize: Dramatic was presented to Sympathy for Delicious, directed by Mark Ruffalo; written by and starring Christopher Thornton about a recently paralyzed DJ who seeks out the dubious world of faith healing.

As announced on Tuesday, the 2010 Jury Prize in Short Filmmaking was awarded to Drunk History: Douglass & Lincoln (Director: Jeremy Konner). The 2010 Jury Prize in International Short Filmmaking was given to The Six Dollar Fifty Man / New Zealand (Directors and screenwriters: Mark Albiston and Louis Sutherland). In addition, the jury awarded Honorable Mentions in Short Filmmaking to: Born Sweet/ USA, Cambodia (Director: Cynthia Wade); Can We Talk? / United Kingdom (Director and screenwriter: Jim Owen); Dock Ellis & The LSD No-No/ USA (Director: James Blagden); How I Met Your Father / Spain (Director and screenwriter: Álex Montoya); Quadrangle / USA (Director: Amy Grappell); Rob and Valentyna in Scotland / USA, United Kingdom (Director: Eric Lynne; Screenwriters: Eric Lynne and Rob Chester Smith), andYoung Love / Australia (Director and screenwriter: Ariel Kleiman).

Obselidia, written and directed by Diane Bell, is the recipient of this year’s Alfred P. Sloan Prize. The Prize, which carries a $20,000 cash award by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, is presented to an outstanding feature film focusing on science or technology as a theme, or depicting a scientist, engineer, or mathematician as a major character.

Sundance Institute and NHK (Japan Broadcasting Corporation) on Thursday announced the winners of the Sundance / NHK International Filmmakers Awards honoring and supporting emerging filmmakers-

one each from the United States, Japan, Europe, and Latin America. The winning filmmakers and projects are: Amat Escalante, Heli from Mexico; Andrey Zvyagintsev, Elenafrom Russia; Daisuke Yamaoka, The Wonderful Lives at Asahigaoka (written with Yugo Eto) from Japan; and Benh Zeitlin, Beasts of the Southern Wild (written with Lucy Alibar) from the United States.

BAFTA AWARDS NOMINATIONS

BEST FILM

AVATAR James Cameron, Jon Landau

AN EDUCATION Finola Dwyer, Amanda Posey

THE HURT LOCKER Nominees TBC

PRECIOUS: BASED ON THE NOVEL PUSH BY SAPPHIRE Lee Daniels, Sarah Siegel-Magness, Gary Magness

UP IN THE AIR Ivan Reitman, Jason Reitman, Daniel Dubiecki

OUTSTANDING BRITISH FILM

AN EDUCATION Finola Dwyer, Amanda Posey, Lone Scherfig, Nick Hornby

FISH TANK Kees Kasander, Nick Laws, Andrea Arnold

IN THE LOOP Kevin Loader, Adam Tandy, Armando Iannucci, Jesse Armstrong, Simon Blackwell, Tony Roche

MOON Stuart Fenegan, Trudie Styler, Duncan Jones, Nathan Parker

NOWHERE BOY Robert Bernstein, Douglas Rae, Kevin Loader, Sam Taylor-Wood, Matt Greenhalgh

OUTSTANDING DEBUT BY A BRITISH WRITER, DIRECTOR OR PRODUCER

LUCY BAILEY, ANDREW THOMPSON, ELIZABETH MORGAN HEMLOCK, DAVID PEARSON Directors, Producers

Mugabe and the White African

ERAN CREEVY Writer/Director – Shifty

STUART HAZELDINE Writer/Director – Exam

DUNCAN JONES Director – Moon

SAM TAYLOR-WOOD Director – Nowhere Boy

DIRECTOR

AVATAR James Cameron

DISTRICT 9 Neill Blomkamp

AN EDUCATION Lone Scherfig

THE HURT LOCKER Kathryn Bigelow

INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS Quentin Tarantino

ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY

THE HANGOVER Jon Lucas, Scott Moore

THE HURT LOCKER Mark Boal

INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS Quentin Tarantino

A SERIOUS MAN Joel Coen, Ethan Coen

UP Bob Peterson, Pete Docter

ADAPTED SCREENPLAY

DISTRICT 9 Neill Blomkamp, Terri Tatchell

AN EDUCATION Nick Hornby

IN THE LOOP Jesse Armstrong, Simon Blackwell, Armando Iannucci, Tony Roche

PRECIOUS: BASED ON THE NOVEL PUSH BY SAPPHIRE Geoffrey Fletcher

UP IN THE AIR Jason Reitman, Sheldon Turner

FILM NOT IN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE

BROKEN EMBRACES Agustín Almodóvar, Pedro Almodóvar

COCO BEFORE CHANEL Carole Scotta, Caroline Benjo, Philippe Carcassonne, Anne Fontaine

LET THE RIGHT ONE IN Carl Molinder, John Nordling, Tomas Alfredson

A PROPHET Pascal Caucheteux, Marco Cherqui, Alix Raynaud, Jacques Audiard

THE WHITE RIBBON Stefan Arndt, Veit Heiduschka, Margaret Menegoz, Michael Haneke

ANIMATED FILM

CORALINE Henry Selick

FANTASTIC MR FOX Wes Anderson

UP Pete Docter

LEADING ACTOR

JEFF BRIDGES Crazy Heart

GEORGE CLOONEY Up in the Air

COLIN FIRTH A Single Man

JEREMY RENNER The Hurt Locker

ANDY SERKIS Sex & Drugs & Rock & Roll

LEADING ACTRESS

CAREY MULLIGAN An Education

SAOIRSE RONAN The Lovely Bones

GABOUREY SIDIBE Precious: Based on the Novel Push by Sapphire

MERYL STREEP Julie & Julia

AUDREY TAUTOU Coco Before Chanel

SUPPORTING ACTOR

ALEC BALDWIN It’s Complicated

CHRISTIAN McKAY Me and Orson Welles

ALFRED MOLINA An Education

STANLEY TUCCI The Lovely Bones

CHRISTOPH WALTZ Inglourious Basterds

SUPPORTING ACTRESS

ANNE-MARIE DUFF Nowhere Boy

VERA FARMIGA Up in the Air

ANNA KENDRICK Up in the Air

MO’NIQUE Precious: Based on the Novel Push by Sapphire

KRISTIN SCOTT THOMAS Nowhere Boy

MUSIC

AVATAR James Horner

CRAZY HEART T-Bone Burnett, Stephen Bruton

FANTASTIC MR FOX Alexandre Desplat

SEX & DRUGS & ROCK & ROLL Chaz Jankel

UP Michael Giacchino

CINEMATOGRAPHY

AVATAR Mauro Fiore

DISTRICT 9 Trent Opaloch

THE HURT LOCKER Barry Ackroyd

INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS Robert Richardson

THE ROAD Javier Aguirresarobe

EDITING

AVATAR Stephen Rivkin, John Refoua, James Cameron

DISTRICT 9 Julian Clarke

THE HURT LOCKER Bob Murawski, Chris Innis

INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS Sally Menke

UP IN THE AIR Dana E. Glauberman

PRODUCTION DESIGN

AVATAR Rick Carter, Robert Stromberg, Kim Sinclair

DISTRICT 9 Philip Ivey, Guy Potgieter

HARRY POTTER AND THE HALF-BLOOD PRINCE Stuart Craig, Stephenie McMillan

THE IMAGINARIUM OF DOCTOR PARNASSUS Nominee

GOLDEN GLOBES 2010: The winner
Christophe waltz paid homage to Quentin Tarantino during his emotional acceptance speech last night at th 67th Golden Globe Awards for his jaw -dropping performance as Colonel Hans Landa in “Inglourious Basterds“.

Waltz has already received a Bambi (German Awards) and the best supporting actor award at the 15th annual Critics’ Choice Movie Awards ceremony at the Hollywood Palladium last week.

His performance has won him rave reviews ever since the film was screened at the Cannes Film Festival last year  where he also received  the best actor award. Critics and audiences have agreed that he definitely should be this year’s recipient for best supporting actor at the Academy Awards ceremony next month.

By Fab Poller

GOLDEN GLOBES 2010: The winners
golden globes

Best Supporting Actress in a Motion Picture: Mo’Nique for “Precious: Based on the Novel ‘Push’ by Sapphire”

Best Actress in a TV Series, Comedy or Musical: Toni Collette for “The United States of Tara”

Best Supporting Actor in a Series, Miniseries or Motion Picture Made for Television: John Lithgow for “Dexter”

Best Animated Feature Film: “Up”

Best Actor in a Television Series, Drama: Michael C. Hall for “Dexter”

Best Actress in a Television Series, Drama: Julianna Marguiles for “The Good Wife”

Best Original Song, Motion Picture: The Weary Kind, “Crazy Heart;” Music and Lyrics by Ryan Bingham, T-Bone Burnett

Best Original Score, Motion Picture: Michael Giacchino for “Up”

Best Miniseries or Motion Picture Made for Television: “Grey Gardens”

Best Actress in a Motion Picture, Comedy or Musical: Meryl Streep for “Julie & Julia”

Best Actor in a Miniseries or TV Movie: Kevin Bacon for “Taking Chance”

Best Actress in a Miniseries or TV Movie: Drew Barrymore for “Grey Gardens”

Best Screenplay, Motion Picture: Jason Reitman and Sheldon Turner for “Up in the Air”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series, Comedy or Musical: Alec Baldwin for “30 Rock”

Best Foreign Language Film: “The White Ribbon” (Germany)

Best Television Series, Drama: “Mad Men”

Best Supporting Actress in a Series, Miniseries or TV Movie: Chloe Sevigny for “Big Love”

Best Supporting Actor in a Motion Picture: Christoph Waltz for “Inglourious Basterds”

Best Director, Motion Picture: James Cameron for “Avatar”

Best TV Series, Comedy or Musical: Glee

Best Motion Picture, Comedy or Musical: The Hangover

Golden Globes
The Bagger has landed in L.A., ready to join the fray with only the barest essentials for the days of parties surrounding the Golden Globes. Meanwhile, our colleague Brooks Barnes takes a look at what the Globes, to be held on Sunday, will be doing differently this year to attract a larger audience. For the first time in 15 years, the broadcast will have a host, Ricky Gervais, whose appeal gibes with the “anything-can-happen” vibe the show likes to present.

“He’s just slightly dangerous,” Barry Adelman, the executive vice president for television at Dick Clark Productions, which produces the show, told  Mr. Barnes. “He’s always teetering on a should-I-really-say-that edge.”

The producers are aiming for a 10 percent ratings increase, so they are also boosting their star wattage, placing  people like Taylor Lautner, the “Twilight”hunk, at the table with the cast of “The Hurt Locker.” Of course, this  probably means that the cast of “The Hurt Locker” can’t bring guests. And as of early this week, some nominees  weren’t even sure they could get a seat. Scott Neustadter and Michael H. Weber, the screenwriters of “(500) Days  of Summer,” which was nominated for best picture (musical or comedy), were awaiting word on whether there  would be room for them at all amid the crush of bigger celebrities. (The cliché of Hollywood ignoring writers turns  out, in this case, to be all too true.)

But Mr. Neustadter and Mr. Weber, who are first-timers not only to awards season but also to movie-making in  general (their breakup comedy is based on Mr. Neustadter’s own experience), were sanguine about the whole  process and menschy in general. If they didn’t get invited to the Globes, no big whoop; they’d still crash the  parties. And just in case, they planned to do it up at the People’s Choice awards on Friday, and offered the Bagger  a chance to ride along. Car-pooling is very L.A., right?

“THE HANGOVER”, BEST COMEDY OF THE YEAR?

Bradley Cooper, Zach Galifianakis and Ed Helms in a scene from “The Hangover.”
“The Hangover.”

At the lunch for “Up in the Air,” the Bagger cornered Ivan Reitman to ask whether “The Hangover,” a huge box-office success this year, would make it on his list of The 10. Absolutely, he said. (Presumably “Up in the Air” would still be No. 1, though with the New Math it would also have to be Nos. 2, 3 and so on.)

“It’s very hard to make a film that funny,” said Mr. Reitman, whose credits as a director and producer include “Ghostbusters” and “Animal House.” “People say, oh, I know comedy’s hard, but they never give it any respect — as somebody who has obviously had a chip on his shoulder for over 30 years of doing comedy.”

Being truly funny, he continued, “why is that not as difficult to pull off as ‘Avatar’? Or some of those more subtle art movies? You know, art movies are good, I’m not knocking them. I think ‘Hangover’ is harder to do than ‘An Education.’ And I loved ‘An Education.’ ‘Hangover’ normally never will end up on a list, where ‘An Education’ will always end up on a list.”

GOLDEN GLOBES NOMINATIONS

“Up in the Air” continued its award season march Tuesday morning, as Golden Globe voters nominated the Paramount Pictures film for six trophies, including best picture drama. The musical “Nine” also emerged as a front-runner at the Globes with five nods, including one for best comedy or musical.

View the complete list of nominees here and fill out an interactive ballot for the awards here.

“Up in the Air,” about an executive who travels the country to fire people for companies too cowardly to do it themselves, also earned nominations for George Clooney (best actor in a drama), Jason Reitman (director), Mr. Reitman and Sheldon Turner (screenplay), and Vera Farmiga and Anna Kendrick (supporting actress).

The expensive “Avatar,” James Cameron’s $230 million 3-D space adventure,tied Quentin Tarantino’s “Inglourious Basterds”, with four nominations each, including best motion picture drama. The other nominees in that category were “The Hurt Locker” and “Precious: Based on the Novel ‘Push’ by Sapphire.”

In the best comedy or musical category, “Nine” was joined by “The Hangover,” “(500) Days of Summer,” “It’s Complicated” and “Julie & Julia.”

Among the acting categories, Meryl Streep and Sandra Bullock will be receiving double floral deliveries. Ms. Streep was nominated twice for best actress in a comedy or musical for “It’s Complicated” and “Julie & Julia,” and Ms. Bullock received honors in both the comedy (for “The Proposal”) and drama (for “The Blind Side”) categories.

Joining Mr. Clooney in the best actor drama category are Jeff Bridges (“Crazy Heart”), Colin Firth (“A Single Man”), Morgan Freeman (“Invictus”) and Tobey Maguire (“Brothers.”)

“Glee,” the Fox show about a group of misfits in a high school singing club, was the big winner in television, picking up four nominations, including best comedy.

The Golden Globes, given by the approximately 90-member Hollywood Foreign Press Association, are not taken seriously as artistic milestones, and studios complain that the organization nominates based on star wattage instead of performance, in part so it can curate a red carpet spectacle.

Still, the Globes are considered important Academy Awards tea leaves. The best picture Oscar has mirrored the association’s choice for best drama or best comedy-musical in 15 of the last 22 years, including last year with“Slumdog Millionaire.” The Globes can also inject fresh momentum to Oscar campaigns or effectively end others.

The 67th Golden Globes will be presented on Jan. 17 at a ceremony to be broadcast on NBC. Last January’s telecast attracted sharply fewer viewers than in years past, partly because of an effective hiatus in 2008 but also because of the oversaturation of celebrity coverage on television.
About 14.6 million people tuned in last year, according to Nielsen Media Research, down from 20 million in 2007. In 2008 the Globes turned into a glorified press conference because of a screenwriters’ strike, attracting 6.2 million viewers.

Expect a flurry of efforts to prop up the awards show in the ratings. Already, the organization has announced that the show will be presented live in all time zones for the first time and that it will have a host for the first time in years, the impudent British actor and writer Ricky Gervais.

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